Gaustadtoppen, Norway

Today is the Constitution Day here in Norway, which basically means that everyone is going mental in the streets. So, instead of going mad in a rather large crowd, I went to the mountains. Always find piece of mind in the mountains.

Shot a few pictures too. Enjoy.

Had a short stop, needed to pee!

This is the mountain. This is the road. What great fun.

Far more people than expected. Don’t they have better things to do…?

Atlantic Ocean Road

The route was originally proposed as a railway line in the early 20th century, but this was abandoned. Serious planning of the road started in the 1970s, and construction started on 1 August 1983. During construction the area was hit by 12 European windstorms. The road was opened on 7 July 1989, having cost 122 million Norwegian krone, of which 25 percent was financed with tolls and the rest from public grants. Collection of tolls was scheduled to run for 15 years, but by June 1999 the road was paid off and the toll removed. The road is preserved as a cultural heritage site and is classified as a National Tourist Route. It is a popular site to film automotive commercials, has been declared the world’s best road trip and been awarded the title as “Norwegian Construction of the Century”. In 2009, the Atlantic Ocean Tunnel opened from Averøy to Kristiansund; together they form a second fixed link between Kristiansund and Molde.

Schrammsteinaussicht (Bad Schandau), Germany

The Schrammsteine are a long, strung-out, very jagged group of rocks in the Elbe Sandstone Mountains located east of Bad Schandau in Saxon Switzerland in East Germany. To the north they are bordered by the Kirnitzsch valley, to the south by the Elbe valley and to the east by the Affensteine rocks. The high point of the chain lies at over 400 metres ASL. The viewing point on the Schrammsteine lies at a height of 417,2 metres ASL.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schrammsteine

Kleinsteinhöhle, Germany

A beautiful natural cave surrounded by deep forests and soft hills.

The best way to get to this remote area is by car from Bad Schandau. Follow the beautiful winding road called “Kirnitzschtalstraße” until you reach the starting point, the parking lot “Wanderparkplatz Sturmbauers Eck” ( no parking ticket required). Cross the street and follow the wooden sign with a red line – you won’t miss it. The way leads you through a forest on wooden stairs. After a short uphill hike of 15 minutes you’ll reach Kleinsteinhöhle, one of the most scenic caves in the “Sächsische Schweiz”. Enjoy the cave and the view while having a picnic with your loved ones.

Lienz, Austria

Lienz is a medieval town in the Austrian state of Tyrol. It is the administrative centre of the Lienz district, which covers all of East Tyrol. The municipality also includes the cadastral subdivision of Patriasdorf.

The area of Lienz had been settled since the Bronze Age about 2000 BC. Celtic people lived here from about 300 BC on, mainly as miners, who came under control of the Roman Empire in 15 BC. The area was incorporated into the province of Noricum and Emperor Claudius had a municipium called Aguntum erected near Lienz in the today’s municipality of Dölsach. Aguntum became the see of an Early Christian bishop in the 5th century but decayed during the Slavic settlement of the Eastern Alps and the subsequent fights with the Bavarii under King Tassilo I about 600. Part of the Slavic principality of Carantania, the area passed under Bavarianandfinally Frankish suzerainty during the 8th century. Lienz itself was first mentioned as Luenzina in a deed issued by the Bishop of Brixen about 1030. The settlement itself, together with neighbouring Patriasdorf, then belonged of the Patriarchs of Aquileia, who were elevated to immediate landlords by Emperor Henry IV in 1077. It was then purchased by the scions of the Meinhardiner dynasty, who held the office of Aquileian Vögte (reeves) and chose Lienz as a residence. From about 1127 they called themselves Counts of Görz (Gorizia).