Schrammsteinaussicht (Bad Schandau), Germany

The Schrammsteine are a long, strung-out, very jagged group of rocks in the Elbe Sandstone Mountains located east of Bad Schandau in Saxon Switzerland in East Germany. To the north they are bordered by the Kirnitzsch valley, to the south by the Elbe valley and to the east by the Affensteine rocks. The high point of the chain lies at over 400 metres ASL. The viewing point on the Schrammsteine lies at a height of 417,2 metres ASL.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schrammsteine

Kleinsteinhöhle, Germany

A beautiful natural cave surrounded by deep forests and soft hills.

The best way to get to this remote area is by car from Bad Schandau. Follow the beautiful winding road called “Kirnitzschtalstraße” until you reach the starting point, the parking lot “Wanderparkplatz Sturmbauers Eck” ( no parking ticket required). Cross the street and follow the wooden sign with a red line – you won’t miss it. The way leads you through a forest on wooden stairs. After a short uphill hike of 15 minutes you’ll reach Kleinsteinhöhle, one of the most scenic caves in the “Sächsische Schweiz”. Enjoy the cave and the view while having a picnic with your loved ones.

The Bastion Bridge, Germany

The Bastei is a rock formation towering 194 metres above the Elbe River in the Elbe Sandstone Mountains of Germany. Reaching a height of 305 metres above sea level, the jagged rocks of the Bastei were formed by water erosion over one million years ago. They are situated near Rathen, not far from Pirna southeast of the city of Dresden, and are the major landmark of the Saxon Switzerland National Park. They are also part of a climbing and hiking area that extends over the borders into the Bohemian Switzerland (Czech Republic).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bastei

Lienz, Austria

Lienz is a medieval town in the Austrian state of Tyrol. It is the administrative centre of the Lienz district, which covers all of East Tyrol. The municipality also includes the cadastral subdivision of Patriasdorf.

The area of Lienz had been settled since the Bronze Age about 2000 BC. Celtic people lived here from about 300 BC on, mainly as miners, who came under control of the Roman Empire in 15 BC. The area was incorporated into the province of Noricum and Emperor Claudius had a municipium called Aguntum erected near Lienz in the today’s municipality of Dölsach. Aguntum became the see of an Early Christian bishop in the 5th century but decayed during the Slavic settlement of the Eastern Alps and the subsequent fights with the Bavarii under King Tassilo I about 600. Part of the Slavic principality of Carantania, the area passed under Bavarianandfinally Frankish suzerainty during the 8th century. Lienz itself was first mentioned as Luenzina in a deed issued by the Bishop of Brixen about 1030. The settlement itself, together with neighbouring Patriasdorf, then belonged of the Patriarchs of Aquileia, who were elevated to immediate landlords by Emperor Henry IV in 1077. It was then purchased by the scions of the Meinhardiner dynasty, who held the office of Aquileian Vögte (reeves) and chose Lienz as a residence. From about 1127 they called themselves Counts of Görz (Gorizia).